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TechTalk Blog

Types of Magnetic Torque Couplers – Face-to-Face & Coaxial

In this second post of a series exploring magnetic couplers, we examine two different types of the commonly used “synchronous” style of magnetic torque coupler, which is a style of coupler in which the coupler’s output shaft speed equals the input shaft speed. The two primary versions of the synchronous style torque couplers that we will be discussing are the “Face-to-Face” type and the “Coaxial” type.

An Overview of Magnetic Torque and Linear Couplers

This Tech Talk article is the first in what will become a five-part series of articles focusing on Magnetic Torque and Magnetic Linear Couplers. Magnetic Torque and Magnetic Linear Couplers are used for applications where non-mechanical contact is desired. They are employed in high-vibration applications or where two operating environments need to be separated.

Magnetic Pull Force Explained

Breakaway force, holding force, fixturing force – “How can all of these represent the same measurement?” a younger engineer recently inquired. Engineers and non-engineers alike can be puzzled trying to understand some of the commonly used – but potentially misinterpreted – terms related to the concept of a magnet’s pull force.

These phrases are often used to represent “strength” when writing magnetic specifications. They also may be mentioned when anticipating the work required of a magnet within an application. To add to the potential confusion, maximum holding force or how much tensile force is exerted by any magnet, is often shown in online calculators – like our neodymium pull force calculator – are based on theoretical calculations of flux density.

Magnets With Adhesive Backing – Possibly Your Best Bet to Reduce Fastener and Fabrication Costs

Rare-earth Neodymium magnets can have an attractive pull force of up to 1,000 times the weight of the magnet. This property allows engineers to specify a particularly small magnet for a stay-in-place operation. It can also make it difficult to find an appropriate mechanical fastener (screw / bolt etc.) to hold that small magnet in place. Enter Dura’s adhesive-backed Neodymium magnet discs. Because these magnets are designed with the fastener “built-in,” they give design engineers flexibility and cost savings by allowing production / assembly staff to apply the magnets instantly to a work piece without the need for another component fastener.

Benefits and Drawbacks to Using Halbach Arrays

There is a time and place to use Halbach Arrays over conventional arrays. Depending on your needs, the time and cost involved in manufacturing Halbach Arrays may or may not be worth the investment. This final piece in our four part series on Halbach Arrays discusses the benefits and drawbacks to using these arrays.

Magnet Shorthand: Are Neo Magnets and NdFeB Magnets the Same?

We occasionally get inquiries and manufacturing prints identifying a custom magnet shape using the abbreviation Neo. Because shorthand works – both internally and in discussions with our customers – we likewise sometimes refer to a Neodymium magnet as Neo or NdFeB. Of the rare earth element magnets, Neo magnets are the most commonly specified because they have the highest known energy product for their mass. One might possibly expect the Neo name to mean “new” – and that could be a reasonable assumption based on the fact that they were initially created relatively recently in 1984. The abbreviated name, however, actually comes from the element Neodymium – or Nd.

Did You Know?

Neodymium magnets are the strongest magnet material available, with strengths ranging from 30MGOe to 52MGOe Energy Product.

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