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TechTalk Category: Tech Briefs

Magnetic Pull Force Explained


Breakaway force, holding force, fixturing force – “How can all of these represent the same measurement?” a younger engineer recently inquired. Engineers and non-engineers alike can be puzzled trying to understand some of the commonly used – but potentially misinterpreted terms – related to the concept of a magnet’s pull force.

These phrases are often used to represent “strength” when writing magnetic specifications. They also may be mentioned when anticipating the work required of a magnet within an application. To add to the potential confusion, maximum holding force or how much tensile force is exerted by any magnet, is often shown in online calculators – like our neodymium pull force calculator – are based on theoretical calculations of flux density.

How Heat Affects a Magnet’s Holding Power and How to Use Temperature Coefficients


The maximum operating temperature of a magnet is an important property, but it is simply the point beyond which the magnet will experience an irreversible loss in net magnetization. In actuality, a magnet will lose net magnetization as soon as it starts to heat up. This loss is called “reversible” as it is recovered as soon as the magnet cools back down. While avoiding irreversible loss may seem to be the primary concern, even reversible loss can cause a negative impact on a magnet’s performance because while the magnet does not permanently demagnetize, it may not generate enough field for a given application at a particular operating temperature.

How Air Gap, Workpiece Conditions, and Operating Temperature Affect Magnetic Pull Force

It is not uncommon to see distributors of magnets advertise their products at holding values far above what those magnets will reasonably achieve in a real world setting.  Why would empirical results be lower than listed holding force values?  It may be that the listed force was based on testing completed under the most ideal […]

Magnetic Saturation: Understanding Practical Limitations to How Much Induced Magnetism Can Be Achieved in a Workpiece

There are limits to how much induced magnetism is possible in different materials and similar workpieces of varying size, shape and configuration. The principle of magnetic saturation observes that there is a point of diminishing returns at which attempting more externally applied magnetic field (H) will give rise to no additional magnetic induction (B). Increasing the thickness of a workpiece is generally beneficial. However, these changes will likely impact cost, mass, and possibly ease of manufacturing. It is therefore beneficial to understand and control for the magnetic saturation of materials during the design stage…

How to QC Magnet Strength

Hysteresisgraph in Dura Magnetics’ Lab

How do you QC a permanent magnet, magnetic assembly, or a piece of equipment utilizing magnets?  There are several methods which will pass a Gage R & R, but they are generally unknown to people outside of the magnet industry.  Much of the technical data about magnetic fields, both commonly published and taught at the […]

Magnetic Permeability:  Why Are Some Materials Attracted By A Magnet And Others Are Not?

Magnetic Induction - Permeability Plot

Two magnets attract to each other because their fields interact.  Usually materials that are not magnets do not have a net external field, and obviously, they do not attract to things; however, some metal alloys can have a net field created by applying an external field.  This induced field is only present when the external […]

Did You Know?

Neodymium magnets are the strongest magnet material available, with strengths ranging from 30MGOe to 52MGOe Energy Product.

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